Why Has the Price of a Microsoft 365 Subscription Not Budged?

That’s despite global inflation and the dramatic improvements Excel has seen.

Andrew Moss

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Two weeks ago, the bombshell news about Python integration coming to Excel was greeted with rip-roaring excitement. The secret had been well-kept by tight-lipped Microsoft MVPs, who were finally able to bombard us with their pre-recorded demos to whet our appetites.

However, amidst the intrigue and curiosity was a small sigh of disapproval about what was stated in Microsoft’s official blog:

“While in Preview, Python in Excel will be included with your Microsoft 365 subscription. After the Preview, some functionality will be restricted without a paid license. More details will be available before General Availability.”

Many of us are scratching our heads, wondering what “some functionality will be restricted without a paid license” actually means and whether this could have wider implications. However, it does raise an interesting talking point about the future.

Most people use Excel as part of Microsoft 365, whether a Personal, Family, Business, Enterprise…

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